God of my salvation… Psalm 51:14

Our God delivers us from sin, from the guilt associated with it, from the dominion of its power, and from the stain of it. Matthew Henry wrote: “The salvation he is the God of is salvation from sin.”

David’s prayer in Psalm 51 was following his sin of adultery with Bathsheba and the abandoning of her husband to death in battle. After the confrontation of the prophet Nathan, and his repentance and God’s forgiveness and restoration, a new understanding of salvation was his. Salvation was not something that he hoped for one day, but something that he experienced in his life at that time.

Salvation is not merely forgiveness. No matter how greatly we long for our sins to be forgiven, for God to be merciful to us, salvation must mean much more. It is the rejuvenation of our soul and spirit, it is God putting back the pieces of our life that lust, pride, and sin had destroyed. But this is who God is, this is why Christ came, so that the effects of sin would be turned back in our lives, so that life would come, and we could live again in His pleasure.

Salvation is personal. No man was ever truly saved in his own estimation merely by the mechanical and impersonal spreading about of the grace of God. Grace must not only have a face, but it must be one that looks at the sinner and accepts him again. Oswald Chambers wrote:

The questions that matter in life are remarkably few, and they are all answered by the words — “Come unto Me.” Not — “Do this, or don’t do that”; but — “Come unto Me.”

We are personable beings, and our soul longs for God and His acceptance of us,. If we do not experience it, we will chase after acceptance by someone or something else, and this leads us back into sin. The victory of the power of sin can only dwell in the human soul who is confident of God’s acceptance. Whenever the cross of Christ is preached it must be complimented by the Christ of the cross, and it is incomplete until the Word and the Spirit impress upon our hearts that God will look at us again and smile upon us.

We cannot read these words of David without recalling the time that David failed his son Absalom, and let him return to Jerusalem but for two years did not see his face. Those two years caused the soul of Absalom to harden against his father, and we are wondering how differently history would have read had David been more gracious.

Is God such a Father to us? No, thank God! “Come unto Me,” Christ says to us today by His Spirit. We come to Him in our hearts in prayer and repentance, and He assures us of forgiveness. We see His face again, as we lie prostrate before Him.

The world does not understand grace. It dwells in the land of Vengeance and Retribution, of Anger and Getting Even. But those of us who know Christ, know Him also as the God of our Salvation.  Come to Christ and He will meet the inner desires of your soul.

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